Category: News

Donor’s $3 million gift expands options for southern scholars

A distinguished neurologist and philanthropist’s generous gift of NZ$3 million will support southern students to pursue their studies in Science, Music, Health Sciences and Engineering at the University of Canterbury (UC) and University of Otago.

Dr Elman Poole bequeast will support undergraduate scholarships for students from Southland Boys’ and Southland Girls’ High Schools, and an increased number of postgraduate travelling scholarships for Otago and UC students.

Dr Poole, who grew up in Invercargill and graduated with a degree in Medicine from Otago in 1950, passed away in June 2019 in the United Kingdom, aged 93. The scholarships reflect his passion for science and music, his commitment to enabling southern talent to shine and his desire to give others the experience of overseas fellowships that he had enjoyed.

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Rise of the tradies: Record numbers sign up as apprentices

More school leavers are training to become builders, electricians and plumbers: apprenticeships in traditional trades have nearly doubled in the past year.

Data from the Ministry of Education shows the number of new apprentices under the age of 18 jumped from 460 in the six months from August 2019 to 810 for the same period in 2020.

This is supported by Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) data for enrolments in tertiary and vocational study that shows a 17.6 per cent increase from December 2019 to December 2020. The total numbers went from 45,155 in 2019 and 57,035 in 2020.

Some students are also leaving earlier in Year 12, rather than the final year of school, to train on the job in their chosen field.

Read the full article here

From: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/rise-of-the-tradies-record-numbers-sign-up-as-apprentices/RODI7XRL2GXW7HBP5R5JZQL6HU/

REACH Scholarships for Y13 Maori students interested in a career in health

 

Ngā mihi mahana ki a koutou katoa. The University of Otago, Māori Health Workforce Development Unit is pleased to inform you that applications for the Otago REACH (Realising Educational Aspirations for Careers in Health) scholarship will be open on the 1st of May.

This scholarship is for Year 13 Māori secondary students interested in a career in health and is hosted by the University of Otago. The Scholarship covers; flights, accommodation, food and activities over 3 days.

The main requirement is that students are aspiring to a career in health. Studying science subjects at levels 2 and 3, and their involvement or interest in te Ao Māori will strengthen their application however we strongly encourage all students with aspirations in health.

The REACH Otago Scholarship provides the opportunity for up to twenty Year 13 Māori students to spend three nights and days on the University of Otago’s Dunedin campus. Students from across New Zealand experience university life first-hand: living in and visiting residential colleges; attending lectures; meeting current Otago students; and learning about the various degree and study options Otago offers, particularly in health.

For further information please refer to the attached document or the link below.

Applications close 15th of June, 2021.

https://www.otago.ac.nz/mhwdu/tearahauora/#reach

MAKING MINDFUL DECISIONS FOR YOUR FUTURE

You have been navigating high school and determining the direction of your future in the midst of New Zealand’s pandemic. An event that has commanded attention across every facet of life. I take my hat off to you all. You’ve had no choice but to map out your path forward in parallel with the world stage.

I think this will bring both benefits and challenges.

PROS

+ You’ll enter the adult world more worldly than my peers at that age.

+ You’ll hold conscious empathy for others’ struggles.

+ You’ll have developed critical thinking skills and probably have a better idea of your values.

CONS

– The challenge, though, is not missing out on the period of your life that should be more carefree than adulthood. The time where you can live easily in the moment, dream widely about your future, believe the best in people, hold grand optimism, travel and experientially discover your values.

The global context is important but so too is your individual life; they don’t have to be mutually exclusive.

My advice is to take time to make mindful decisions about your future, there is no rush. Have fun alongside the study, make the most of young adult life and your friends.

And if you’re searching for some direction, you might find reflecting on the following questions helpful:

1. What do you do that sparks joy?

2. When do you feel most satisfied?

3. What are you good at?

4. What do you believe is important for the world?

5. How can you wind those together to make a living?

Credit: www.leavingschool.co.nz

How to help your teenager with their career decisions

Never before has a generation had to adapt so quickly. Industries, jobs and skills are disappearing and evolving all the time and keeping up with the changes can be a very real challenge.

You can help your child face this new way of navigating their career path by helping them to learn to be agile and resilient.

Be their advocate, encourage them and walk alongside them as they work this out. Not only will you help them make wise decisions, your relationship can be strengthened when they feel trusted and supported.

Career choices are not for life.

A “job for life” mindset is no longer valid. The idea that a certain qualification will set them on a certain path forever is out of date with what actually happens these days. Certainly, their choices now can affect the options available to them but it is almost as certain that whatever path they choose now will not be their last.

Widen your support network

Add friends who your teen trusts, ask people you know in industries your teen has an interest in to talk to them, bring in older and younger contacts to be available to share their experiences with them.

Encourage choosing subjects that are of interest

Notice what subjects spark your child’s interest and gives them energy – you want them to engage with school, not disengage because they aren’t inspired by what they are studying. It pays to help them understand the subjects that will be required if they want to follow certain interests into tertiary study, but also to remember that all is not lost if they require further short-term study to gain access later on. The most important thing is that they want to study and they are interested in what they are learning.

Expand the possibilities they are aware of

Attend the Career Expo, look online, chat with friends, engage with the school career advisor – make sure you and your child feel empowered with knowledge.

Ask questions, challenge beliefs

The key is to manage this without criticising them. Clear up any misunderstandings they may have about work so that they are making choices based on accurate information.

Encourage work experience

The more they are exposed to, the more they will understand if that is right for them or not. Paid or volunteer work develops a positive work ethic and builds confidence and competence.

Let’s bust some myths about careers!

From talking to many (many!) young people looking at their career options over the past few decades, we have come to realise that there are a number of misconceptions out there that are worth addressing

True or False?

1. By the time you leave school you should know what you want to do for a career.

False

Career decision-making is lifelong. The ideas that we have as youth are often just a starting point, or might be based on ideals and expectations that don’t necessarily translate into a lasting career.

You may need more time to build your career identity and figure out where your place is – and that is okay.

Expect and embrace changes along the way and remember that your career might take time to shape – all of this is normal.

2. Individuals will have six or seven careers or more in their lifetime.

False

Everybody has one career. Career is a combination of work and life roles including paid/unpaid work and activities you enjoy. The kind of work that you do may change, but the journey you are on is lifelong.

3. If you follow your passion you can’t go wrong.

False

It depends on what your passion is! Two important questions about your career are: “Who am I becoming now?” and “Who do I want to become?”

Think about who you are becoming now and ask yourself:

· Is this who I want to become?

· What do I truly value, what interests me and what are my strengths; what drives, excites, and inspires me, what frustrates me? What do I admire in others?

Your answers will hint at the person you want to become.

· What are the things I need to do to understand myself better and become the person I want to be?

· Whom can I ask if I am unsure? Who can I bounce ideas off that I trust?

4. A career professional might be the best person to help you.

True

Talk to your school careers advisor or engage a professional if you feel like you are at a crossroads or need some clarity. Career advisors think beyond jobs – they want to help you pull out where your strengths are and what kinds of fields you can add value to.

Keep up to date with career news and tips on our website

www.careersexpo.org.nz

Let’s bust some myths about careers!

From talking to many (many!) young people looking at their career options over the past few decades, we have come to realise that there are a number of misconceptions out there that are worth addressing

True or False?

1. By the time you leave school you should know what you want to do for a career.

False

Career decision-making is lifelong. The ideas that we have as youth are often just a starting point, or might be based on ideals and expectations that don’t necessarily translate into a lasting career.

You may need more time to build your career identity and figure out where your place is – and that is okay.

Expect and embrace changes along the way and remember that your career might take time to shape – all of this is normal.

2. Individuals will have six or seven careers or more in their lifetime.

False

Everybody has one career. Career is a combination of work and life roles including paid/unpaid work and activities you enjoy. The kind of work that you do may change, but the journey you are on is lifelong.

3. If you follow your passion you can’t go wrong.

False

It depends on what your passion is! Two important questions about your career are: “Who am I becoming now?” and “Who do I want to become?”

Think about who you are becoming now and ask yourself:

· Is this who I want to become?

· What do I truly value, what interests me and what are my strengths; what drives, excites, and inspires me, what frustrates me? What do I admire in others?

Your answers will hint at the person you want to become.

· What are the things I need to do to understand myself better and become the person I want to be?

· Whom can I ask if I am unsure? Who can I bounce ideas off that I trust?

4. A career professional might be the best person to help you.

True

Talk to your school careers advisor or engage a professional if you feel like you are at a crossroads or need some clarity. Career advisors think beyond jobs – they want to help you pull out where your strengths are and what kinds of fields you can add value to.

Keep up to date with career news and tips on our website

www.careersexpo.org.nz

What is…biology?

Biology is the study of living things, from molecules and cells to organisms, populations, and entire ecosystems. As University of Canterbury lecturer Pieter Pelser will tell you, “it’s a great playground for anyone who is curious about the mysteries of life”.

Learn more here>